Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tapbirds

Date

August 2, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tapbirds

Date

August 2, 2014

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

tapbirds

Date

August 2, 2014

Description

Grub found in a Koa tree (Acacia koa), food source for the extremely rare 'Akiapola'au (Hemignathus munroi)

Photos / Sounds

14814968282_2526da39fd_s

Observer

tapbirds

Date

August 1, 2014

Photos / Sounds

What

Great Mullein Verbascum thapsus

Observer

milopyne

Date

July 30, 2014 06:25 PM HST

Description

Small peak near observatory visitors center; invasive exotic.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

milopyne

Date

July 30, 2014 05:19 PM HST

Description

In enclosure near Visitors Center for Observatories

Photos / Sounds

11660267566_4606fe8f51_s

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:50 PM EST

Description

Aphid, I think ... not sure if it's a good enough shot for an ID.

I made a point of photographing the flowers I found up here at 9200 ft, thinking that maybe there would be a higher likelihood of native species. No such luck!

Photos / Sounds

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What

Mauna Kea silversword Argyroxiphium sandwicense ssp. sandwicense

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 01:04 PM EST

Description

In a fenced exclosure near the visitor center. The multi-headed growth is a result of inbreeding during the first propagation attempts. Normal plants grow as a single rosette, and the entire plant dies after sending up an inflorescence; here a couple of heads have bloomed, but the rest of the plant remains alive.

These used to be the dominant flora in the harsh alpine environment on the upper elevations of Mauna Kea. The white hairs act as tiny fiber optic conduits that can heat the leaf tips by 20 deg C, allowing the plant to grow in the cold. But the plant had no defenses against introduced grazing animals. Both subspecies, the Mauna Kea and the one from Haleakala on Maui, are endangered, and this one was driven to the brink of extinction. In 1984 only 131 plants were known, only 15 of which were not propagated by man. A single wild population was found, clinging to a precarious cliff where even the goats and mouflon sheep couldn't reach. The plants grow for 5-40 years before sending up a flowering stalk and then dying. This makes propagation difficult, and inbreeding during early propagation attempts, which started with only 1 or 2 flowering parents, led to poor survival rates and the deformity seen here, in which the plant branches into many rosettes rather than the normal one. A later generation of propagation attempts has involved heroic efforts to rescue the species' remaining genetic diversity. When a precious plant in the wild blooms, biologists, rappelling down cliff faces, hand-pollinate the tens of thousands of individual flowers (the bees that used to cross-pollinate the silverswords have declined along with the plant itself; and, in any case, the chances of two plants flowering close enough to one another for natural cross-pollination to occur are vanishingly small) and then collect & outplant the resulting seeds. There are now several thousand progeny. However, they still derive from only 6 wild founders. Hopefully that will continue to increase as more of the now ~40 wild plants bloom.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:07 PM EST

Description

Oenothera stricta ssp. stricta. Showy, 5 cm across.

I made a point of photographing the flowers I found up here at 9200 ft, thinking that maybe there would be a higher likelihood of native species. No such luck!

Photos / Sounds

11690093754_1423634d71_s

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:59 PM EST

Description

In a fenced exclosure near the visitor center. These used to be the dominant flora in the harsh alpine environment on the upper elevations of Mauna Kea. The white hairs act as tiny fiber optic conduits that can heat the leaf tips by 20 deg C, allowing the plant to grow in the cold. But the plant had no defenses against introduced grazing animals. Both subspecies, the Mauna Kea and the one from Haleakala on Maui, are endangered, and this one was driven to the brink of extinction. In 1984 only 131 plants were known, only 15 of which were not propagated by man. A single wild population was found, clinging to a precarious cliff where even the goats and mouflon sheep couldn't reach. The plants grow for 5-40 years before sending up a flowering stalk and then dying. This makes propagation difficult, and inbreeding during early propagation attempts, which started with only 1 or 2 flowering parents, led to poor survival rates and a deformity in which the plant branched into many rosettes rather than the normal one.

This guy was 23 cm across & had a yellow marker flag dated 7/23/13. Hopefully it is from a later generation of propagation attempts, which have involved heroic efforts to rescue the species' remaining genetic diversity. When a precious plant in the wild blooms, biologists, rappelling down cliff faces, hand-pollinate the tens of thousands of individual flowers (the bees that used to cross-pollinate the silverswords have declined along with the plant itself; and, in any case, the chances of two plants flowering close enough to one another for natural cross-pollination to occur are vanishingly small) and then collect & outplant the resulting seeds. There are now several thousand progeny like this one. However, they still derive from only 6 wild founders. Hopefully that will continue to increase as more of the now ~40 wild plants bloom.

Photos / Sounds

What

Telegraphweed Heterotheca grandiflora

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:05 PM EST

Description

I made a point of photographing the flowers I found up here at 9200 ft, thinking that maybe there would be a higher likelihood of native species. No such luck! This species I didn't recognize because, unlike at lower elevation, it had no 'telegraph pole' -- it was dwarfed and growing low to the ground.

Photos / Sounds

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What

māmane Sophora chrysophylla

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:20 PM EST

Description

This one's native, endemic, and a dominant shrub in the subalpine zone.

Photos / Sounds

11658047005_2d2209e8e8_s

What

Madagascar Ragwort Senecio madagascariensis

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:09 PM EST

Description

I made a point of photographing the flowers I found up here at 9200 ft, thinking that maybe there would be a higher likelihood of native species. No such luck!

Photos / Sounds

What

Hypochoeris radicata Hypochaeris radicata

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:49 PM EST

Description

I made a point of photographing the flowers I found up here at 9200 ft, thinking that maybe there would be a higher likelihood of native species. No such luck!

Photos / Sounds

11660316895_d4e52e3b26_s

What

Yellow-billed Cardinal Paroaria capitata

Observer

anita363

Date

November 23, 2013 12:54 PM EST

Description

A tanager, despite the name

Photos / Sounds

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What

Erckel's Francolin Francolinus erckelii

Observer

jnstuart

Date

June 30, 2005

Place

Mauna Kea (Google, OSM)

Description

Somewhere on the Mauna Kea access road, Big Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA. Two birds showed up at our picnic site.

Photos / Sounds

P1270504

What

Hawai'i 'Amakihi Hemignathus virens

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 11:44 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 12:20 PM EDT

Description

One of the many invasive plants in refuge. There appears to be minimal control of exotic grasses (and other cover plants?). Land managers have their hands full with other species!

Photos / Sounds

P1270563

What

Dragonflies Suborder Anisoptera

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 01:50 PM EDT

Description

This blurry observation represents the perils of too many birding tours in the world, and not enough odonate ones. This meadow was our turn-around point, and as the rest of the group called for me to join them as they returned back up the hill, I was waiting to get a better glimpse that never came of a large darner patrolling back and forth. What was it -- something native and interesting? Or an introduced common darner? Dunno. I think if I could have stayed a while longer, all mystery would have been revealed to me.

Photos / Sounds

What

Genus Peperomia Genus Peperomia

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 12:16 PM EDT

Description

Epiphyte from the pepper family. Our guide told a great Hawaiian story that was associated with this species and the red undersides of its leaves. Trying to find it online still!

Photos / Sounds

What

Koa Acacia koa

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 12:17 PM EDT

Photos / Sounds

P1270444

What

Gossamer-winged Butterflies Family Lycaenidae

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 10:25 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

'Amakihi Hemignathus virens

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 10:40 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Akepa Loxops coccineus

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 10:51 AM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Photos / Sounds

What

Brambles Genus Rubus

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 11:05 AM EDT

Description

Giant fruits.

Photos / Sounds

What

Turkey Meleagris gallopavo

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 09:33 AM EDT

Description

See the single small chick/poult behind.

Photos / Sounds

What

Wild Pig Sus scrofa

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 09:36 AM EDT

Description

About to disappear into the scotch broom-esque bush.

Photos / Sounds

P1270439

What

California Quail Callipepla californica

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 09:38 AM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

'Ohi'a lehua Metrosideros polymorpha

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 11:11 AM EDT

Description

This common native tree and the kona were the two species that our group was taught so we could help each other with directions for bird-watching.

Small seeds, in hand.

Photos / Sounds

What

Hawaiian Thrush Myadestes obscurus

Observer

muir

Date

April 16, 2013 11:18 AM EDT

Place

(Somewhere...)

Description

Obscured view, but found and IDed by guide and I think there's not many other similar options.